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Emilia Clarke’s surgery after TWO aneurysms left sections of her brain unusable <!-- wp:html --><div></div> <div> <h2>Emilia Clarke’s surgery after TWO aneurysms rendered parts of her brain useless</h2> <p class="author-section byline-plain">By Emma Powell for The Daily Mail </p> <p class="byline-section"><span class="article-timestamp article-timestamp-published"> <span class="article-timestamp-label">Published:</span> 01:04, 18 July 2022 </span> | <span class="article-timestamp article-timestamp-updated"> <span class="article-timestamp-label">Updated:</span> 01:12, 18 July 2022 </span> </p> <p> <!-- ad: https://mads.dailymail.co.uk/v8/gb/tvshowbiz/none/article/other/para_top.html --> <!-- CWV --><!--[if !IE]>>--> <!-- <!--[if IE]>--></p> <p> <!--[if !IE]>>--> <!--<!--[if IE]>--></p> <p> <!--[if !IE]>>--> <!--<!--[if gte IE 8]>>--> <!-- <!--[if IE 8]>--></p> <p> <!--[if IE 9]>--></p> <p> <!--[if IE]>--></p> <p> <!--[if !IE]> --> <!--</p> <p> <!-- SiteCatalyst code version: H.20.3. Copyright 1997-2009 Omniture, Inc. More info available at http://www.omniture.com --> </p> <p> <!-- End SiteCatalyst code version: H.20.3. --> <!--[if IE]>--></p> <p> <!--[if !IE]> --> <!--<!--[if IE]>--></p> <p> <!--[if !IE]> --> </p> <p> <!-- <!-- CWV --></p> <div> <p class="mol-para-with-font">Emilia Clarke said yesterday that she would no longer be able to speak after two aneurysms in her brain became “unusable”.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">The actress, 35, in the photo said she was in the “really small minority” of people who survived and were “without consequences.”</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">Her first aneurysm ruptured in 2011 after she filmed the first series of Game Of Thrones causing a stroke, while the second required surgery in 2013 after scans showed it had doubled in size.</p> <div class="artSplitter mol-img-group"> <div class="mol-img"> <div class="image-wrap"> </div> </div> <p class="imageCaption">Emilia Clarke starred in Game Of Thrones and now makes her West End debut by acting in The Seagull</p> </div> <div class="artSplitter mol-img-group"> <div class="mol-img"> <div class="image-wrap"> </div> </div> <p class="imageCaption">She told the BBC that her experiences have given her ‘a lot of perspective’ – especially after her second surgery in 2013</p> </div> <div class="artSplitter mol-img-group"> <div class="mol-img"> <div class="image-wrap"> </div> </div> <p class="imageCaption">The actress, 35, pictured onstage ahead of her West End debut, said she was in the ‘really small minority’ of people who survived and have ‘no consequences’ from two aneurysms</p> </div> <p class="mol-para-with-font">Miss Clarke, who appears in The Seagull in her West End debut, told Sophie Raworth on BBC1’s Sunday Morning: ‘You get a lot of perspective. The amount of my brain that is no longer usable… There’s quite a bit missing that always makes me laugh.’</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">Her life-saving treatment has left her with titanium instead of parts of her skull and scars.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">The actress first suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage after the aneurysm — a weak area in a blood vessel — burst on the surface of the brain.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">They are most common in people between the ages of 45 and 70 and can lead to patients with extreme fatigue, difficulty sleeping, headaches, visual disturbances and loss of movement.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">But Miss Clarke said she has remained untouched, adding: ‘I can play for two and a half hours every night and not forget a sentence. I’ve always had a good memory because it’s the only skill as an actor… so your memory is obviously very important and I’ve tested that consistently.’</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">She said she “gave up wondering” about what’s going on in her brain because “There’s no point in constantly worrying about what might not be there, because what you have now is great.”</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">The actress, who played ‘Mother of Dragons’ Daenerys Targaryen in the hit Sky Atlantic series, spoke about the trauma of her ordeal in 2019.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">Miss Clarke, who founded the charity SameYou to help people recovering from brain injury and stroke, makes her West End debut in The Seagull.</p> </div> <p> <!-- ad: https://mads.dailymail.co.uk/v8/gb/tvshowbiz/none/article/other/inread_player.html --></p> <div class="column-content cleared"> <div class="shareArticles"> <h3 class="social-links-title">Share or comment on this article: </h3> </div> </div> </div><!-- /wp:html -->

Emilia Clarke’s surgery after TWO aneurysms rendered parts of her brain useless

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Emilia Clarke said yesterday that she would no longer be able to speak after two aneurysms in her brain became “unusable”.

The actress, 35, in the photo said she was in the “really small minority” of people who survived and were “without consequences.”

Her first aneurysm ruptured in 2011 after she filmed the first series of Game Of Thrones causing a stroke, while the second required surgery in 2013 after scans showed it had doubled in size.

Emilia Clarke starred in Game Of Thrones and now makes her West End debut by acting in The Seagull

She told the BBC that her experiences have given her ‘a lot of perspective’ – especially after her second surgery in 2013

The actress, 35, pictured onstage ahead of her West End debut, said she was in the ‘really small minority’ of people who survived and have ‘no consequences’ from two aneurysms

Miss Clarke, who appears in The Seagull in her West End debut, told Sophie Raworth on BBC1’s Sunday Morning: ‘You get a lot of perspective. The amount of my brain that is no longer usable… There’s quite a bit missing that always makes me laugh.’

Her life-saving treatment has left her with titanium instead of parts of her skull and scars.

The actress first suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage after the aneurysm — a weak area in a blood vessel — burst on the surface of the brain.

They are most common in people between the ages of 45 and 70 and can lead to patients with extreme fatigue, difficulty sleeping, headaches, visual disturbances and loss of movement.

But Miss Clarke said she has remained untouched, adding: ‘I can play for two and a half hours every night and not forget a sentence. I’ve always had a good memory because it’s the only skill as an actor… so your memory is obviously very important and I’ve tested that consistently.’

She said she “gave up wondering” about what’s going on in her brain because “There’s no point in constantly worrying about what might not be there, because what you have now is great.”

The actress, who played ‘Mother of Dragons’ Daenerys Targaryen in the hit Sky Atlantic series, spoke about the trauma of her ordeal in 2019.

Miss Clarke, who founded the charity SameYou to help people recovering from brain injury and stroke, makes her West End debut in The Seagull.

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