Thu. Feb 29th, 2024

    Double demerits come into effect this Australia Day long weekend – here’s what you need to know

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    Motorists have been urged to drive safely over the Australia Day long weekend or face double demerit points and risk very hefty fines.

    A state-wide police blitz in New South Wales will begin at midnight on January 25 and will last for four full days until 11.59pm on Sunday.

    During this time, double penalties and twice the normal fine will be imposed for offenses such as speeding, using a mobile phone while driving, not wearing a seat belt and not wearing a helmet on a motorcycle.

    NSW Police have also advised of major road closures around Sydney on Australia Day, particularly within the CBD, around Circular Quay and The Rocks.

    An additional 200 public transport services will be built to offset road closures and make it easier for people to get to Australia Day events.

    Daily Mail Australia has compiled a list of the various penalties that will be imposed across the country for drivers who misbehave this long weekend.

    Motorists have been urged to drive safely over the Australia Day long weekend or face double demerits and risk hefty fines. In the photo, a man sits in a car after being stopped by a police officer

    New South Wales, ACT

    Double demerits will be in effect from midnight on Thursday and will continue until 11.59pm on Sunday 28 January.

    Under the scheme, which was first introduced in 1997, anyone caught speeding, talking on their mobile phone, driving without a helmet or not wearing a seat belt will lose double the normal number of points on their driving license and will receive he will be fined twice as much.

    NSW Police have advised officers will be across the road ‘in numbers’, with patrols monitoring on the ground, in the air and on the water.

    State Police Minister Yasmin Catley reminded people to act in a manner consistent with the interests of the community and their personal safety, not only when driving, but also around public gatherings and high-risk places such as waterways.

    “Friendship, camaraderie, respect and diversity are all part of our story, and everyone has a role to play in looking after their friends and loved ones on Australia Day,” she said.

    ‘If you plan on drinking, make sure you have a plan B and know how to get home. Don’t drive under the influence and be careful on and around waterways.’

    A state-wide police blitz in New South Wales will begin at midnight on January 25 and will last for four full days until 11.59pm on Sunday. A traffic jam in Sydney is pictured

    Drivers are being warned to drive carefully over the Australia Day long weekend, with double demerit points applicable. NSW Police officers are pictured talking to drivers

    Queensland

    Queensland has a permanent double points system which differs from the public holiday-based system in other states.

    Drivers who commit repeat offenses in Queensland will be hit with tougher penalties.

    In concrete terms, if a driver commits the same offense two or more times within a twelve-month period, double penalty points apply to the second and any subsequent offences.

    Victoria, South Australia, Northern Territory and Tasmania

    Victoria, South Australia, Northern Territory and Tasmania do not have a double points scheme.

    But police in those areas will be present over the Australia Day long weekend.

    Using a mobile phone while driving (pictured) is one of the offenses that will result in double demerit points over the Australia Day long weekend

    Western Australia

    In Western Australia, the double penalty period runs from Thursday to Sunday, with the penalty period also applying to running a red light.

    WA enforces double demerits around most public holidays, including the Australia Day weekend.

    The state also takes a very dim view of people trying to avoid speed cameras.

    If a motorist is caught driving a vehicle fitted with a device designed to evade detection by a speed camera, or driving a vehicle in a manner that can evade detection by a speed camera, as many as 14 penalty points will be added to their driver’s license are noted.

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