Thu. Feb 9th, 2023
Fiona Phillips ‘hasn’t felt the same’ after the death of ‘brother’ Bill Turnbull

Fiona Phillips has said she “hasn’t felt the same” since the death of fellow television personality and friend Bill Turnbull, whom she considered a brother.

She revealed her shock after the former BBC Breakfast presenter passed away last week at the age of 66 following a battle with prostate cancer.

Speak with the mirror Fiona, 61, said: “I just haven’t felt the same since I heard the terrible news. He was just such a first-class person.’

Sad: Fiona Phillips has said she “hasn’t felt the same” since the death of fellow TV personality and friend Bill Turnbull, whom she considered a brother

Fiona fondly recalled working with Bill on BBC1’s daytime program Holding Back The Years, which aired from 2017 to 2018.

She said: ‘I already knew Bill through the Journalists’ Association, but that show was the first and last time I worked closely with him and we clicked right away’.

The show was about well-being for older people and Fiona joked with her and Bill hated being considered old enough to host.

Friends: Fiona fondly recalled working with Bill on BBC1’s daytime program Holding Back The Years, which aired from 2017 to 2018

Adding: ‘He was just so sweet, so caring and a gentleman. By the end of filming, I just felt like he was my brother.’

It comes after Bill’s former co-host Susanna Reid said that after his prostate cancer diagnosis five years ago, he “would have no complaints” if he died the next day.

The former BBC Breakfast presenter revealed in a Radio Times interview in March 2018 that he had discovered he was ill last November while filming for The Great British Bake Off’s Stand Up to Cancer special.

RIP: The beloved host sadly passed away after his battle with prostate cancer at the age of 66 August 31st

When he appeared on ITV’s Good Morning Britain after his death, an emotional Reid recalled what Bill had said at the time, saying that his words ‘really touched me when I read them’ and that she was ‘so grateful to have known him’ .

He had said, ‘The contract I thought I had with life has been cut short. You have to be positive, don’t you? I know I won’t be cured and I’m realistic about the long-term prospects, but they’re not bad.

“Most importantly, I really think I’ve had a great life, with great experiences as a reporter and host. And if it all ended tomorrow, I would have no complaints. I really had a great time.’

Honor: It comes after Bill’s former co-host Susanna Reid said that after his prostate cancer diagnosis five years ago, he “could have no complaints” if he died the next day

Susannah, who first worked with Turnbull as his producer more than 25 years ago when he was a BBC News correspondent in Washington, also told GMB: “I was absolutely blown away by the loss of Bill.”

She continued: “He was such a funny person to be around…and I don’t want to sound gloomy when I talk about him because he had such a sense of humor. I remember when he presented on this show we called him a “sauce pot” because he definitely had a way with ambiguities, really. He was pleasant company.’

BBC Breakfast presenters Bill Turnbull and Susanna Reid on the couch together on April 5, 2012

She also shared today how Turnbull helped one of her children overcome their fear of dogs, saying her former colleague was “the dog whisperer.”

She told BBC Breakfast presenters Naga Munchetty and Charlie Stayt how Turnbull’s dogs were ‘such an important part of his life’. Reid said, “When we all moved to Salford, he invited me and my family, my children, to his home to spend the day with Sesi and the dogs. My middle son was absolutely petrified of all animals at the time.

“We couldn’t have a pet at home, he would be scared if there was a cat in the yard, and he was literally in the kitchen. And Bill took that very carefully, and he encouraged my son to throw a ball for Bonnie, Bill’s beloved black labrador.

“And by the end of that day, my son had completely lost his fear of dogs. We were allowed to have a cat in the house. He was like, he was like the kid whisperer, or the dog whisperer, or Dr. Dolittle.

“I mean, he could talk to the animals. He was amazing, they were so important to him and he wanted everyone to have that same experience.”

WHAT IS PROSTATE CANCER?

How many people does it kill?

More than 11,800 men a year – or one every 45 minutes – are killed by the disease in Britain, compared with around 11,400 women who die from breast cancer.

It means that prostate cancer is only behind lung and colon cancer in terms of how many people it kills in Britain.

In the US, the disease kills 26,000 men every year.

Despite this, it receives less than half of breast cancer research funding and treatments for the disease are at least a decade behind.

How many men are diagnosed annually?

Every year in the UK more than 52,300 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer – more than 140 a day.

How fast does it develop?

Prostate cancer usually develops slowly, so there may be no signs that a person has had it for years, according to the NHS.

If the cancer is at an early stage and not causing symptoms, a policy of ‘watchful waiting’ or ‘active surveillance’ may be followed.

Some patients can be cured if the disease is treated at an early stage.

But if diagnosed at a later stage, when it has spread, it becomes terminal and treatment revolves around relieving symptoms.

Thousands of men are deterred from being diagnosed because of the treatment’s known side effects, including erectile dysfunction.

Testing and Treatment

Tests for prostate cancer are haphazard, with accurate tools just beginning to show up.

There is no nationwide prostate cancer screening program because the tests have been too inaccurate for years.

Doctors struggle to differentiate between aggressive and less severe tumors, making it difficult to make a decision about treatment.

Men over 50 are eligible for a “PSA” blood test, which gives doctors a rough idea of ​​whether a patient is at risk.

But it is unreliable. Patients who get a positive result usually get a biopsy that is also not foolproof.

Scientists don’t know what causes prostate cancer, but age, obesity and lack of exercise are known risks.

Anyone concerned can contact the specialist nurses at Prostate Cancer UK on 0800 074 8383 or visit prostatecancer.org

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