Wed. Feb 28th, 2024

    Giant 8in spiders from China are set to invade the US: Black and yellow critters seen parachuting through the air on the east coast – and will soon hit New York and New Jersey

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    An 8-inch-long venomous spider native to Asia, whose palm-sized females cannibalize their male companions, is flying up the U.S. East Coast and even spreading westward.

    Experts say the Jorō spider can fly 50 to 100 miles at a time, using its webs like parasails to glide with the wind, and is hitchhiking on East Coast highways, but they are not known to pose a threat to humans. or your pets. .

    However, it is not yet known what impact this gentle giant spider, which is believed to have first arrived in the US a decade ago via shipping containers that arrived in Georgia, might have on wildlife. and local ecosystems.

    One thing is certain, according to an ecologist at Rutgers University’s Lockwood Laboratory in New Jersey: “Very soon, possibly even next year, they should be in New Jersey and New York.”

    An 8-inch-long venomous spider native to Asia, whose palm-sized females cannibalize their male companions, is flying up the U.S. East Coast and even spreading westward.

    Experts say the Jorō spider can fly 50 to 100 miles at a time, using its webs like parasails to glide with the wind, and is hitchhiking along the roads of the East Coast. One environmentalist says he will be in New York and New Jersey “very soon, possibly even next year.”

    “It’s a question of when, not if,” said PhD student and ecologist José R. Ramírez-Garofalo of the Rutgers Lockwood Lab. Staten Island Preview.

    “Right now, we’re seeing them disperse into Maryland,” said Ramirez-Garofalo, who also serves as vice president of Pine Oak Woods Protectors on Staten Island.

    Last month, other ecological and entomological researchers from New York, Tennessee, Texas and South Carolina pooled their resources in an effort to predict how quickly and how far the invasive Jorō spider will travel. it was likely to spread.

    The short answer spans the entire continental United States, Canada, and even parts of Mexico.

    Their findings, published in the journal Ecology and Evolution‘add evidence that T. clavata [Jorō spider’s species name Trichonephila clavata] “It is an invasive species and deserves much greater ecological scrutiny,” they wrote.

    ‘While the impacts of T. clavata “No effects on human or pet health have been documented,” they continued, “our data show that their ecological impacts may not be equally benign as their invasion progresses.”

    The researchers hope that their estimates, based on captured spiders and climate comparisons between North American regions and Jorō habitats in Japan, China, Korea and Taiwan, will prompt action to protect house spider species.

    “These patterns should strongly motivate financial institutions and researchers to focus their attention on this invasion,” they wrote, “and consider ways to mitigate its impacts on native communities.”

    Last month, other ecological and entomological researchers from New York, Tennessee, Texas and South Carolina pooled their resources in an effort to predict how quickly and how far the invasive Jorō spider was likely to spread. The short answer is widespread throughout the United States.

    The researchers hope that their estimates, based on captured spiders and climate comparisons with regions of North America and Jorō’s home habitats in Japan, China, Korea and Taiwan, will prompt action to protect house spider species.

    While Jorōs are venomous, experts say they are not a threat to humans or dogs and cats, and will not bite them unless they feel very threatened.

    If they bite, it will feel like an occasional pinch, since spiders’ fangs are not large and sharp enough to pierce human skin, according to Paula Cushing, an arachnologist at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, who allowed one to bite. go to your palm.

    In contrast, the Jorō spider feeds primarily on flies, mosquitoes, and bed bugs, the latter being not only a threat to crops, but also a threat currently free of natural predators in some parts of the United States.

    Researchers say the Jorō could be a blessing in disguise for farmers and should be left alone.

    “There’s really no reason to go around actively crushing them,” said Benjamin Frick, a researcher at the University of Georgia. ‘Humans are at the root of their invasion. Don’t blame the spider Jorō.

    More than 150 years ago, a cousin of the Jorō spider, called the golden silk spider, also came to the United States from South America and the Caribbean.

    However, unlike the Jorō, these spiders do not have the same body characteristics to spread in different climates of the country, since they mainly live in the southeastern United States.

    The life cycle of Jorō spiders usually ends in late fall or early winter. The next generation emerges in spring.

    Colorful, venomous palm-sized Joro spiders to take over East Coast

    The Joro spider is one of many types of orb-weaving spiders that belong to the genus trichonephila. It can be found throughout Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and China, and now in the US, especially South Carolina and Georgia, since 2014.

    Female joro have colorful yellow, blue and red markings on their bodies and are highly prized in Japan. They measure approximately 1.7 to 2.5 cm (0.66 to 0.98 in), but those found in Georgia can measure 8 cm (3 in) long when their legs are fully extended, according to anypest.com.

    Male Joros are much simpler and only have a brown body. They are smaller than their counterparts, measuring approximately 0.70 to 1 cm (0.27 to 0.39 in).

    Joro spiders can be easily observed during the spring, summer, and fall, before their one-year life cycle ends in the winter (November and December).

    Joro spiders typically have a one-year life cycle and are an invasive species native to Japan.

    They are venomous, but pose no threat to humans or domestic pets and will not bite unless they feel in danger. Their fangs are also not long and sharp enough to penetrate human skin.

    The eight-legged insects also repel mosquitoes and biting flies. They are one of the few spiders that catch and eat stink bugs, which are serious pests of many crops..

    Joros have about twice the metabolism of the golden silk spider and a 77 percent higher heart rate, allowing them to live in the cold, unlike most spiders.

    They use a “balloon flight” technique that allows them to trap air with their net, allowing them to travel between 50 and 100 miles. Most of the time, Joro spiders can be found in groups and not far from forests.

    They are also great stowaways, having arrived in the US by clinging to cargo ships in 2014.

    Giant 8in spiders from China are set to invade the US: Black and yellow critters seen parachuting through the air on the east coast – and will soon hit New York and New Jersey

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