Sun. Apr 21st, 2024

31 photos that show how Air Force One has changed through the years<!-- wp:html --><p>President Joe Biden meets with staff aboard Air Force One in 2021.</p> <p class="copyright">Official White House Photo by Adam Schultz</p> <p>Any plane carrying a US president is called Air Force One.<br /> John F. Kennedy was the first to use a jet designed specifically for a US president.<br /> President Donald Trump proposed new paint colors for the exterior of Air Force One in 2019.</p> <p>Since the mid-20th century, US presidents have flown on special planes designated as "Air Force One" while carrying out their official duties.</p> <p>Nicknamed the "flying Oval Office," today's Air Force One is equipped with everything the president might need, including office spaces, two kitchens, sleeping quarters, and a fully functional operating room.</p> <p>Here's how the design of Air Force One has changed through the years.</p> <div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">President Dwight D. Eisenhower was the first president to travel on a jet aircraft in 1959.</div> <div class="slide-image">Air Force One taking off in 1959. <p class="copyright">Terry Fincher/Mirrorpix/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>Eisenhower's Boeing 707 Stratoliner, nicknamed "Queenie," featured a section for telecommunications, room for 40 passengers, a conference area, and a stateroom, according to <a href="https://www.britannica.com/topic/Air-Force-One/Air-Force-One-enters-the-jet-age">Encyclopedia Britannica</a>.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">John F. Kennedy was the first to use a jet specifically designed for the US president. It had the tail number 26000.</div> <div class="slide-image">President John F. Kennedy's pilot, Colonel James B. Swindal, left, and Major Lewis Hanson, co-pilot, check Air Force One's cockpit before a presidential take-off in 1963. <p class="copyright">John Rous</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The Boeing 707 included a living room, bedroom, bathroom, and kitchen, according to Encyclopedia Britannica.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">Raymond Loewy designed the plane's blue and white exterior.</div> <div class="slide-image">President John F. Kennedy and first lady Jacqueline Kennedy arrive in San Antonio, Texas, in 1963. <p class="copyright">Kennedy Library Archives/Newsmakers/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The plane's design featured an American flag on the tail and presidential seals on the nose.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">After Kennedy's assassination, President Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in on Air Force One.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Lyndon Baines Johnson takes the oath of office on Air Force One in 1963. <p class="copyright">Universal History Archive/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>It marked the first and only time a presidential swearing-in ceremony took place on an airplane.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">Johnson met with Cabinet members on the presidential aircraft in 1966 in a small seating area.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Lyndon Johnson meets with cabinet members on Air Force One. <p class="copyright">Bettmann/Contributor/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The small alcove was decorated with a globe decal on the wall and curtains lining the windows.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">In 1972, Richard Nixon was the first president to use the Boeing 707 plane with tail number 27000 as Air Force One.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Richard Nixon aboard Air Force One. <p class="copyright">Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>Nixon stood behind the plane's bar while meeting with military and civilian leaders en route to Vietnam.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">When President Gerald Ford took office after Nixon resigned, seats in the rear cabin were upholstered with striped fabric.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Gerald Ford holds a mini news conference aboard Air Force One. <p class="copyright">Bettmann/Contributor/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>Presidents would occasionally make their way back to the rear cabin to chat with reporters.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">Ford's office, just off the stateroom, also featured striped furniture.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Gerald Ford poses with Candice Bergen on Air Force One in 1975. <p class="copyright">David Hume Kennerly/ Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>Ford is pictured with Candice Bergen, the first female photographer to shoot a behind-the-scenes story on an American president.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">President Jimmy Carter outfitted the press area with blue carpeting.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Carter is interviewed aboard Air Force One in 1978. <p class="copyright">Bettmann/Contributor/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>Carter talked to reporters on his way back from a trip to Europe in 1978.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">President Ronald Reagan used 27000 as his primary presidential aircraft.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Ronal Reagan meets with advisors aboard the plane in 1983. <p class="copyright">Bill Fitz-Patrick - White House via CNP/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>Reagan met with Secretary of State George P. Shultz and national security advisor-designate Robert McFarlane in a meeting space that featured a magazine rack, teal chair, wood grain table, and photos of him and first lady Nancy Reagan.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">Reagan also hung pictures of himself in Air Force One's rear cabin.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Ronald Reagan with reporters aboard Air Force One in 1981. <p class="copyright">Bettmann/Contributor/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The photos show Reagan toasting with a champagne glass and waving while boarding Air Force One.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">New blue striped curtains matched the blue carpeting and furniture in another meeting area.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Ronald Reagan with staff aboard Air Force One. <p class="copyright">CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The meeting room also included a television set.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">In 1990, George H. W. Bush began using new Boeing 747 planes with tail numbers 28000 and 29000 as Air Force One.</div> <div class="slide-image">The presidential office of Air Force One in 1990. <p class="copyright">Consolidated News Pictures/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The presidential office was updated with a stately desk, gray carpeting, and leather chairs.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">The staff and secretarial area was decorated with neutral whites and grays.</div> <div class="slide-image">The staff and secretarial area of Air Force One in 1990. <p class="copyright">Consolidated News Pictures/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The staff area featured plenty of phones for official business. Air Force One is also known as the "flying Oval Office."</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">The new plane's annex could also be configured for medical use.</div> <div class="slide-image">The Annex of Air Force One. <p class="copyright">Consolidated News Pictures/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The annex is pictured in executive configuration, with seating for meetings.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">The new planes featured over 4,000 square feet of space, which President Bill Clinton often used to hold meetings.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Bill Clinton holds a meeting aboard Air Force One. <p class="copyright">LUKE FRAZZA/AFP via Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>Clinton met with a delegation from North and South Dakota to address flooding in the area.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">In the guest area, Clinton's Air Force One featured tan chairs and blue carpeting.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Bill Clinton on Air Force One. <p class="copyright">DAVID SCULL/AFP via Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>Clinton met with members of Congress to discuss nuclear waste management in 1999.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">President George W. Bush flew 27000 one last time in August 2001 before it was retired to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.</div> <div class="slide-image">President George W. Bush and first lady Laura Bush sit aboard Air Force One on the plane's last mission in 2001. <p class="copyright">Rick Wilking/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The plane flew 444 missions adding up to over 1 million miles, according to the <a href="https://georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov/news/releases/2001/08/20010829-7.html">Bush White House.</a></p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">When the World Trade Center and Pentagon were attacked on September 11, 2001, the Secret Service kept Bush in the air aboard the new Air Force One.</div> <div class="slide-image">President George W. Bush talks on the telephone on September 11, 2001, as senior staff huddle in his office aboard Air Force One. <p class="copyright">Eric Draper, Courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Library/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>Bush insisted on returning to Washington, but the Secret Service refused since they were unsure if more attacks were coming.</p> <p>In a 2016 interview with <a href="https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/09/were-the-only-plane-in-the-sky-214230/">Politico</a>, Bush's assistant White House press secretary Gordon Johndroe described Air Force One that day as "the safest and most dangerous place in the world at the exact same time."</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">Bush conferred with chief of staff Andy Card in his stateroom, designed by Nancy Reagan.</div> <div class="slide-image">President George W. Bush and Andy Card on September 11, 2001. <p class="copyright">Eric Draper, Courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Library/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The president's suite included a small bed, light-pink couch and carpeting, and a desk with a brown leather chair.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">Bush walked down a hallway arm-in-arm with Harriet Miers, assistant to the president and staff secretary.</div> <div class="slide-image">President George W. Bush and Harriet Miers on September 11, 2001. <p class="copyright">Eric Draper, Courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Library/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The hallway was lined with a beige couch with side tables and lamps on either side.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">When President Barack Obama took office, Air Force One's conference room had been updated with a television screen and brown leather chairs.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Barack Obama talks with his staff aboard Air Force One in 2009. <p class="copyright">Pete Souza/White House via Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The plane has 85 phone lines as well as encryption and scrambling devices to ensure secure communication, <a href="https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/09/were-the-only-plane-in-the-sky-214230/">CNBC</a> reported.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">On the other side of the conference room, a decal that read "Air Force One" was displayed on wood paneling.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Barack Obama talks on the phone aboard Air Force One. <p class="copyright">Official White House Photo by Pete Souza</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The food and drinks are provided by the plane's galley kitchen.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">The plane's senior staff room featured more phones, a coat closet, and leather chairs.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Barack Obama talks with senior staff and former President Bill Clinton on Air Force One in 2012. <p class="copyright">Official White House Photo by Pete Souza</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>Obama met with chief of staff Jack Lew, senior advisors David Axelrod and David Plouffe, and former president Bill Clinton in the senior staff room in 2012.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">The presidential office furniture was also updated, with mahogany chairs and sofas replacing the gray.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Barack Obama meets with staff on Air Force One in 2014. <p class="copyright">Official White House Photo by Pete Souza</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The carpeting was updated to a subtle star pattern, which also appears in the conference room.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">The plane's guest section was reserved for special visitors like members of Congress.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Barack Obama talks with a Congressional delegation aboard Air Force One in 2009. <p class="copyright">Official White House photo by Pete Souza</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The chairs feature a subtle polka-dot pattern, and the tables fold down to make more space.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">The rear cabin for press looked just like a standard commercial airliner.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Barack Obama arrives to brief traveling journalists on board Air Force One in 2010. <p class="copyright">JEWEL SAMAD/AFP via Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>Journalists can wander the rear cabin freely, but they aren't allowed to walk forward to speak to the president — the president has to come back to them.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">President Donald Trump proposed new paint colors for the exterior of Air Force One in 2019.</div> <div class="slide-image">A model of the proposed paint scheme of the next generation of Air Force One. <p class="copyright">Alex Wong/Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>As part of the Air Force's Presidential Aircraft Recapitalization program updating Air Force One planes, Trump proposed a red, white, and navy blue color scheme for the new models.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">The Air Force ultimately rejected Trump's proposed color scheme because it would have been more costly and caused engineering issues.</div> <div class="slide-image">Air Force One in February 2024. <p class="copyright">Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram via Getty Images</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>The darker paint color would have caused overheating issues and been too costly, <a href="https://www.politico.com/news/2022/06/10/biden-trump-air-force-one-paint-scheme-00038775" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Politico</a> reported.</p> <p>Instead, Biden <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/what-we-know-about-the-air-force-one-replacement-project-2020-7">selected a baby-blue color scheme</a> similar to the current model. The new VC-25B Air Force One planes are expected to be ready by 2027, according to the <a href="https://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/3326103/new-paint-design-for-next-air-force-one/">Air Force</a>.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">In Biden's Air Force One, the conference room has the same star carpeting as the plane's presidential office.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Joe Biden meets with staff aboard Air Force One in 2021. <p class="copyright">Official White House Photo by Adam Schultz</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>Plain beige carpeting continues down the hallway.</p> </div> </div> <div class="slide"> <div class="slide-title">The placard in the conference room has been updated to read "Aboard Air Force One" with an image of the iconic aircraft.</div> <div class="slide-image">President Joe Biden participates in a phone interview on Air Force One. <p class="copyright">Official White House Photo by Adam Schultz</p> </div> <div class="slide-content"> <p>President Joe Biden took his first overseas trip as president in June 2021, visiting Europe for the G7 leaders' summit.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/air-force-one-photos-through-history-2021-8">Business Insider</a></div><!-- /wp:html -->

President Joe Biden meets with staff aboard Air Force One in 2021.

Any plane carrying a US president is called Air Force One.
John F. Kennedy was the first to use a jet designed specifically for a US president.
President Donald Trump proposed new paint colors for the exterior of Air Force One in 2019.

Since the mid-20th century, US presidents have flown on special planes designated as “Air Force One” while carrying out their official duties.

Nicknamed the “flying Oval Office,” today’s Air Force One is equipped with everything the president might need, including office spaces, two kitchens, sleeping quarters, and a fully functional operating room.

Here’s how the design of Air Force One has changed through the years.

President Dwight D. Eisenhower was the first president to travel on a jet aircraft in 1959.
Air Force One taking off in 1959.

Eisenhower’s Boeing 707 Stratoliner, nicknamed “Queenie,” featured a section for telecommunications, room for 40 passengers, a conference area, and a stateroom, according to Encyclopedia Britannica.

John F. Kennedy was the first to use a jet specifically designed for the US president. It had the tail number 26000.
President John F. Kennedy’s pilot, Colonel James B. Swindal, left, and Major Lewis Hanson, co-pilot, check Air Force One’s cockpit before a presidential take-off in 1963.

The Boeing 707 included a living room, bedroom, bathroom, and kitchen, according to Encyclopedia Britannica.

Raymond Loewy designed the plane’s blue and white exterior.
President John F. Kennedy and first lady Jacqueline Kennedy arrive in San Antonio, Texas, in 1963.

The plane’s design featured an American flag on the tail and presidential seals on the nose.

After Kennedy’s assassination, President Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in on Air Force One.
President Lyndon Baines Johnson takes the oath of office on Air Force One in 1963.

It marked the first and only time a presidential swearing-in ceremony took place on an airplane.

Johnson met with Cabinet members on the presidential aircraft in 1966 in a small seating area.
President Lyndon Johnson meets with cabinet members on Air Force One.

The small alcove was decorated with a globe decal on the wall and curtains lining the windows.

In 1972, Richard Nixon was the first president to use the Boeing 707 plane with tail number 27000 as Air Force One.
President Richard Nixon aboard Air Force One.

Nixon stood behind the plane’s bar while meeting with military and civilian leaders en route to Vietnam.

When President Gerald Ford took office after Nixon resigned, seats in the rear cabin were upholstered with striped fabric.
President Gerald Ford holds a mini news conference aboard Air Force One.

Presidents would occasionally make their way back to the rear cabin to chat with reporters.

Ford’s office, just off the stateroom, also featured striped furniture.
President Gerald Ford poses with Candice Bergen on Air Force One in 1975.

Ford is pictured with Candice Bergen, the first female photographer to shoot a behind-the-scenes story on an American president.

President Jimmy Carter outfitted the press area with blue carpeting.
President Carter is interviewed aboard Air Force One in 1978.

Carter talked to reporters on his way back from a trip to Europe in 1978.

President Ronald Reagan used 27000 as his primary presidential aircraft.
President Ronal Reagan meets with advisors aboard the plane in 1983.

Reagan met with Secretary of State George P. Shultz and national security advisor-designate Robert McFarlane in a meeting space that featured a magazine rack, teal chair, wood grain table, and photos of him and first lady Nancy Reagan.

Reagan also hung pictures of himself in Air Force One’s rear cabin.
President Ronald Reagan with reporters aboard Air Force One in 1981.

The photos show Reagan toasting with a champagne glass and waving while boarding Air Force One.

New blue striped curtains matched the blue carpeting and furniture in another meeting area.
President Ronald Reagan with staff aboard Air Force One.

The meeting room also included a television set.

In 1990, George H. W. Bush began using new Boeing 747 planes with tail numbers 28000 and 29000 as Air Force One.
The presidential office of Air Force One in 1990.

The presidential office was updated with a stately desk, gray carpeting, and leather chairs.

The staff and secretarial area was decorated with neutral whites and grays.
The staff and secretarial area of Air Force One in 1990.

The staff area featured plenty of phones for official business. Air Force One is also known as the “flying Oval Office.”

The new plane’s annex could also be configured for medical use.
The Annex of Air Force One.

The annex is pictured in executive configuration, with seating for meetings.

The new planes featured over 4,000 square feet of space, which President Bill Clinton often used to hold meetings.
President Bill Clinton holds a meeting aboard Air Force One.

Clinton met with a delegation from North and South Dakota to address flooding in the area.

In the guest area, Clinton’s Air Force One featured tan chairs and blue carpeting.
President Bill Clinton on Air Force One.

Clinton met with members of Congress to discuss nuclear waste management in 1999.

President George W. Bush flew 27000 one last time in August 2001 before it was retired to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.
President George W. Bush and first lady Laura Bush sit aboard Air Force One on the plane’s last mission in 2001.

The plane flew 444 missions adding up to over 1 million miles, according to the Bush White House.

When the World Trade Center and Pentagon were attacked on September 11, 2001, the Secret Service kept Bush in the air aboard the new Air Force One.
President George W. Bush talks on the telephone on September 11, 2001, as senior staff huddle in his office aboard Air Force One.

Bush insisted on returning to Washington, but the Secret Service refused since they were unsure if more attacks were coming.

In a 2016 interview with Politico, Bush’s assistant White House press secretary Gordon Johndroe described Air Force One that day as “the safest and most dangerous place in the world at the exact same time.”

Bush conferred with chief of staff Andy Card in his stateroom, designed by Nancy Reagan.
President George W. Bush and Andy Card on September 11, 2001.

The president’s suite included a small bed, light-pink couch and carpeting, and a desk with a brown leather chair.

Bush walked down a hallway arm-in-arm with Harriet Miers, assistant to the president and staff secretary.
President George W. Bush and Harriet Miers on September 11, 2001.

The hallway was lined with a beige couch with side tables and lamps on either side.

When President Barack Obama took office, Air Force One’s conference room had been updated with a television screen and brown leather chairs.
President Barack Obama talks with his staff aboard Air Force One in 2009.

The plane has 85 phone lines as well as encryption and scrambling devices to ensure secure communication, CNBC reported.

On the other side of the conference room, a decal that read “Air Force One” was displayed on wood paneling.
President Barack Obama talks on the phone aboard Air Force One.

The food and drinks are provided by the plane’s galley kitchen.

The plane’s senior staff room featured more phones, a coat closet, and leather chairs.
President Barack Obama talks with senior staff and former President Bill Clinton on Air Force One in 2012.

Obama met with chief of staff Jack Lew, senior advisors David Axelrod and David Plouffe, and former president Bill Clinton in the senior staff room in 2012.

The presidential office furniture was also updated, with mahogany chairs and sofas replacing the gray.
President Barack Obama meets with staff on Air Force One in 2014.

The carpeting was updated to a subtle star pattern, which also appears in the conference room.

The plane’s guest section was reserved for special visitors like members of Congress.
President Barack Obama talks with a Congressional delegation aboard Air Force One in 2009.

The chairs feature a subtle polka-dot pattern, and the tables fold down to make more space.

The rear cabin for press looked just like a standard commercial airliner.
President Barack Obama arrives to brief traveling journalists on board Air Force One in 2010.

Journalists can wander the rear cabin freely, but they aren’t allowed to walk forward to speak to the president — the president has to come back to them.

President Donald Trump proposed new paint colors for the exterior of Air Force One in 2019.
A model of the proposed paint scheme of the next generation of Air Force One.

As part of the Air Force’s Presidential Aircraft Recapitalization program updating Air Force One planes, Trump proposed a red, white, and navy blue color scheme for the new models.

The Air Force ultimately rejected Trump’s proposed color scheme because it would have been more costly and caused engineering issues.
Air Force One in February 2024.

The darker paint color would have caused overheating issues and been too costly, Politico reported.

Instead, Biden selected a baby-blue color scheme similar to the current model. The new VC-25B Air Force One planes are expected to be ready by 2027, according to the Air Force.

In Biden’s Air Force One, the conference room has the same star carpeting as the plane’s presidential office.
President Joe Biden meets with staff aboard Air Force One in 2021.

Plain beige carpeting continues down the hallway.

The placard in the conference room has been updated to read “Aboard Air Force One” with an image of the iconic aircraft.
President Joe Biden participates in a phone interview on Air Force One.

President Joe Biden took his first overseas trip as president in June 2021, visiting Europe for the G7 leaders’ summit.

Read the original article on Business Insider

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