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San Diego police tell Vision Pro users to ‘cross streets the old-fashioned way’ — without a headset on<!-- wp:html --><p>San Diego police remind Apple Vision Pro users about the importance of pedestrian safety.</p> <p class="copyright">Christian Vierig/Getty</p> <p>San Diego Police told <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/apple" rel="noopener">Apple's</a> Vision Pro users to keep "virtual experiences on the sidewalk."The police posted an Instagram video showing someone crossing the street and wearing the headset. The warning follows instances of people using the headset while crossing streets or driving.</p> <p>San Diego police want you to look both ways before crossing —without a face computer covering your eyes.</p> <p>The San Diego Police Department posted a video on Instagram that <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/apple-vision-pro-headset-people-wearing-driving-crossing-street-2024-2" rel="noopener">shows a pedestrian crossing the street</a> wearing the Apple Vision Pro headset while officers nearby detain someone next to a police car.</p> <p>The police used the video as a reminder to users about the "importance of pedestrian safety."</p> <p>"Keep those virtual experiences on the sidewalk, folks," the post said. "And let's cross streets the old-fashioned way - with our eyes wide open to the real world, unobstructed and without distractions!"</p> <div class="insider-raw-embed"> <div> <a href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C3jH7UkKzgm/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener"> <div> <div></div> <div> <div></div> <div></div> </div> </div> <div></div> <div></div> <div> <div>View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div></div> <div> <div> <div></div> <div></div> <div></div> </div> <div> <div></div> <div></div> </div> <div> <div></div> <div></div> <div></div> </div> </div> <div> <div></div> <div></div> </div> <p></p></a> <p><a href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C3jH7UkKzgm/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by San Diego Police Department (@sandiegopd)</a></p> </div></div> <p>San Diego Police Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.</p> <p>Vision Pro users can still see the world around them while wearing the headset because of the device's passthrough cameras, which present a high-resolution representation of their nearby physical space.</p> <p>But it's still not as clear as reality, and certain conditions, like low light, could impact the effectiveness of its safety features, according to Apple's Vision Pro <a target="_blank" href="https://support.apple.com/en-gb/guide/apple-vision-pro/tana3cdb0b5f/1.0/visionos/1.0" rel="noopener">guide</a>.</p> <p>The headset also has a limited field of vision so instead of seeing out of the corner of your eye, you may see black, similar to wearing ski goggles.</p> <p>The San Diego <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/apple-vision-pro-headset-people-wearing-driving-crossing-street-2024-2" rel="noopener">instance is one of several</a> that has caused concern from government officials as people navigate the unwritten do's and don'ts of the Apple Vision Pro.</p> <p>After a recent video surfaced of someone wearing an <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/what-apple-vision-pro-looks-like-inside-teardown-video-2024-2" rel="noopener">Apple Vision Pro headset</a> while driving a Tesla Cybertruck, US Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg issued a similar warning to drivers.</p> <p>"Reminder — ALL advanced driver assistance systems available today require the human driver to be in control and fully engaged in the driving task at all times," Buttigieg said in a <a target="_blank" href="https://twitter.com/SecretaryPete/status/1754559027688685941" rel="noopener">post</a> on X addressing the video.</p> <p>Apple's Vision Pro user guide recommends against using the headset in a moving vehicle. It also notes that the Vision Pro should never be used on or near roads, streets, or any other area that poses a risk of collision.</p> <div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/san-diego-police-apple-vision-pro-2024-2">Business Insider</a></div><!-- /wp:html -->

San Diego police remind Apple Vision Pro users about the importance of pedestrian safety.

San Diego Police told Apple’s Vision Pro users to keep “virtual experiences on the sidewalk.”The police posted an Instagram video showing someone crossing the street and wearing the headset. The warning follows instances of people using the headset while crossing streets or driving.

San Diego police want you to look both ways before crossing —without a face computer covering your eyes.

The San Diego Police Department posted a video on Instagram that shows a pedestrian crossing the street wearing the Apple Vision Pro headset while officers nearby detain someone next to a police car.

The police used the video as a reminder to users about the “importance of pedestrian safety.”

“Keep those virtual experiences on the sidewalk, folks,” the post said. “And let’s cross streets the old-fashioned way – with our eyes wide open to the real world, unobstructed and without distractions!”

San Diego Police Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Vision Pro users can still see the world around them while wearing the headset because of the device’s passthrough cameras, which present a high-resolution representation of their nearby physical space.

But it’s still not as clear as reality, and certain conditions, like low light, could impact the effectiveness of its safety features, according to Apple’s Vision Pro guide.

The headset also has a limited field of vision so instead of seeing out of the corner of your eye, you may see black, similar to wearing ski goggles.

The San Diego instance is one of several that has caused concern from government officials as people navigate the unwritten do’s and don’ts of the Apple Vision Pro.

After a recent video surfaced of someone wearing an Apple Vision Pro headset while driving a Tesla Cybertruck, US Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg issued a similar warning to drivers.

“Reminder — ALL advanced driver assistance systems available today require the human driver to be in control and fully engaged in the driving task at all times,” Buttigieg said in a post on X addressing the video.

Apple’s Vision Pro user guide recommends against using the headset in a moving vehicle. It also notes that the Vision Pro should never be used on or near roads, streets, or any other area that poses a risk of collision.

Read the original article on Business Insider

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