Fri. Apr 19th, 2024

The 7 Greatest TV and Movie Do-Overs, From ‘Dune’ to ‘Deadpool’<!-- wp:html --><p>Photo Illustration by Luis G. Rendon/The Daily Beast/Disney/Netflix/Universal/Everett</p> <p>Adaptations are hard—so hard, in fact, that when they don’t work out, the IP is often shelved and forgotten. For every <em>Barbie, Iron Man,</em> <em>Hunger Games</em>,<em> </em>or<em> Chicago</em>, <a href="https://www.denofgeek.com/movies/green-lantern-movie-what-went-wrong/">dozens of <em>Green Lanterns</em></a><em>, Cats</em>, and <a href="https://collider.com/what-happened-to-last-divergent-movie-cancelled/">unfinished <em>Divergent</em> franchises</a> never have another chance to “get it right.” Sometimes, these adaptations are massive disasters that bring entire studios to their knees, losing millions and making the IP radioactive for another go. Most of the time, which is even sadder, these works are modest-enough successes that remaking them into something more satisfying isn’t worth the effort. I live every day in fear that I will never see a proper filmed adaptation of <em>Into the Woods</em>, <em>Les Miserables</em>, <em>Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street</em>, or <em>Phantom of the Opera</em>, because their <a href="https://slate.com/culture/2014/12/into-the-woods-starring-meryl-streep-and-emily-blunt-reviewed.html">existing</a> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2014/nov/21/les-miserables-my-most-overrated-film">adaptations</a> are, <a href="https://www.mtv.com/news/4jpsp8/review-sweeney-todd-is-a-bloody-mess-of-a-musical">you know</a>—<a href="https://thewildbloginthewest.blogspot.com/2012/12/movie-musicals-that-got-it-wrong.html">fine.</a></p> <p>Why try it again with something that already didn’t work? Because sometimes, in a few rare instances, the second time’s the charm. (In the case of Netflix’s recent <a href="https://www.thedailybeast.com/obsessed/avatar-the-last-airbender-netflix-review-a-live-action-remake-no-one-wanted"><em>Avatar: The Last Airbender </em>re-remake</a>, however, sometimes even a second take doesn’t cut it—and it’s better to stop while you’re already behind.)</p> <p>Below, we ranked seven films and TV series that gave beloved stories a second chance at life on-screen after a disastrous first start from <em>pretty</em> successful to <em>most</em> successful, based on how much of an impact—and improvement—they made over the original adaptations.</p> <p><a href="https://www.thedailybeast.com/obsessed/the-7-greatest-tv-and-movie-do-overs-of-all-time-from-dune-to-deadpool">Read more at The Daily Beast.</a></p><!-- /wp:html -->

Photo Illustration by Luis G. Rendon/The Daily Beast/Disney/Netflix/Universal/Everett

Adaptations are hard—so hard, in fact, that when they don’t work out, the IP is often shelved and forgotten. For every Barbie, Iron Man, Hunger Games, or Chicago, dozens of Green Lanterns, Cats, and unfinished Divergent franchises never have another chance to “get it right.” Sometimes, these adaptations are massive disasters that bring entire studios to their knees, losing millions and making the IP radioactive for another go. Most of the time, which is even sadder, these works are modest-enough successes that remaking them into something more satisfying isn’t worth the effort. I live every day in fear that I will never see a proper filmed adaptation of Into the Woods, Les Miserables, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, or Phantom of the Opera, because their existing adaptations are, you knowfine.

Why try it again with something that already didn’t work? Because sometimes, in a few rare instances, the second time’s the charm. (In the case of Netflix’s recent Avatar: The Last Airbender re-remake, however, sometimes even a second take doesn’t cut it—and it’s better to stop while you’re already behind.)

Below, we ranked seven films and TV series that gave beloved stories a second chance at life on-screen after a disastrous first start from pretty successful to most successful, based on how much of an impact—and improvement—they made over the original adaptations.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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